To Lady Bowen

Year: 1859
TO LADY BOWEN[1]
 
                    by 'Stylus'  
 
Fair lady of the isles of Greece,-
Those isles renowned in love and song-
We welcome thee to Queensland's shores
Where loving hearts will round thee throng.
 
We have no tales of ancient deeds,
To while away the weary hour;
No heroes number'd 'mongst the dead
Tell of our ancient fame and power;
 
No Solon[2] in our mem'ry lives;
No ruined fanes[3] in grandeur rise;
No Athens rears its hoary head;
No marbles tell of high emprise;
 
No tideless waters lave our shores,
Rich with the fame of byegone years;
No legend wild, no marvel strange,
Upon our hist'ry's page appears.
 
But yet our hearts are warm as those
That bask 'neath Grecia's sunny skies ;
And we may love thy name as well
As those whom thou wast wont to prise.
 
Long mayst thou live to grace our land
May fortune ever smile on thee;
May all the gifts that Heaven can send;
Thy lasting earthly portion be.
 
May all thy way be strewn with flowers;
May all thy cares be light and few;
And should the shades of sorrow fall,
Oh may they fall like evening dew.
 
'Tis in thy pow'r, oh lady fair!
To shed an influence around,
That aye shall make thy name beloved,
And to thy glory shall redound.
 
May Heaven's angels be thy guides
Life's chequered pathway safely o'er ;
And mayst thou ne'er regret the day
That brought thee here to Queensland's shore.
 
'STYLUS'.  Moreton Bay Courier 17 December 1859, p2.
 
 
[1] Diamantina Bowen, (c1832/33-1893), born Diamantina di Roma, in the Ionian Isles (now part of Greece), married Sir George Bowen, 1st Governor of Queensland, in 1856, while Bowen was posted by the British Government to the Ionian Isles. Essentially all Queensland places called Roma or Diamantina are named in her honour. 
 
[2] (c630-560BCE) an early Athenian democrat. 
 

[3] Shrines or temples, another Greek allusion.